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Annular solar eclipse: Your photos


Staff writers

May 21, 2012 — People across the country gathered to watch the first solar eclipse in a decade on Sunday. We've compiled some of our favourite photos, as submitted by you.

Only a partial eclipse was visible from much of Canada
Only a partial eclipse was visible from much of Canada

It was the first solar eclipse to shine on North America in a decade -- and hundreds of Weather Network viewers documented the phenomenon.

Described by astronomer Andrew Yee as a "spectacular astronomical event," an annular solar eclipse occurs when the Sun, Moon and the Earth align.

On Sunday, the Moon was a bit too small to cover the Sun when it moved in front of it -- resulting in a 'ring of fire'.

"The sky was clear in southern Ontario during the time of the solar eclipse, which occurred at about 8:30 p.m. local time," says Gina Ressler, a meteorologist at The Weather Network.

"Southern Manitoba and southern Saskatchewan also had clear conditions. But parts of BC and Alberta weren't as lucky. A stormy system resulted in overcast skies last night."

Only a partial eclipse was visible from much of Canada -- but Weather Network viewers sent in photographs from as far away as Utah, where skywatchers were able to get a much better view.

Visit the Photos & Videos section of the website to see more pictures of the eclipse.

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