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Chris Mei 'finds his float' riding a fat bike


Staff writers
January 29, 2013 — Winter isn't normally considered cycling season across Canada, but as The Weather Network's Chris Mei finds out, with the right bike, it can be the perfect winter sport.


Studded tires can help to give traction on uneven surfaces
Studded tires can help to give traction on uneven surfaces

The winter season has outdoor enthusiasts eager to hit the slopes or catch a ride along a snowmobile trail. But what are cyclists left to do? 

It's called fat biking and it has people riding all season long. 

The term "fat" applies to the size of the tires, which are built to tackle the toughest terrain.

Experts at Hardwood Ski and Bike in Oro-Medonte, Ontario say fat bikes are equipped with a much wider tire. Studded tires can also help to give traction on unstable surfaces like snow, sand, rocks and roots. 

Normal tires are generally about two to three inches wide and the fat tires are up to five inches wide. 

The wide contact patch helps cyclists to essentially "float" on top of the snow.

The Weather Network's Chris Mei says he "found his float"
The Weather Network's Chris Mei says he "found his float"

The Weather Network's Chris Mei tried to "feel the float," while riding a fat big through heavy snow and hilly terrain. 

"If I could imagine what it was like riding a bike on the moon, that would be it," he said after his ride. "I found the float man, I found the float."

Riding a regular bike in the winter creates a washboard effect with the cyclist tracking all over the place. 

The super-sized tire however, offers grip and flotation helping riders track consistently through the snow.

Be sure to tune into The Weather Network on TV to watch Chris Mei's attempt at fat biking. 


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