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Monitor sharks with an online tracker


More than three dozen sharks have been fitted with GPS tags (courtesy: U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service/Wyland)
More than three dozen sharks have been fitted with GPS tags (courtesy: U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service/Wyland)

Cheryl Santa Maria, staff writer

February 5, 2013 — Sharks take centre stage with the OCEARCH global tracker.

When the shark's fin touches the surface, its location is beamed to a satellite
When the shark's fin touches the surface, its location is beamed to a satellite

Cyndi is a hefty girl, weighing in at 2,257 lbs.

Normally found near Cape Town coast, this great white shark has been bitten by the travel bug.

Since November, she's zipped past Mauritius, Reunion Island and Madagascar.

Further south you'll find Louis Antonio, a mature male weighing in at 909 lbs.

He's not the globe-trotting type, preferring to stay near the St. Lucian coast.

These are just two of the nearly three dozen sharks you can keep an eye on with the OCEARCH global shark tracker.

Members of the non-profit organization fitted the sharks with a battery-operated GPS tag on their dorsal fin.

When the fin reaches the surface, the tag switches on and beams information about  temperature, depth and ocean salinity to satellites, which is then posted online.

When the shark re-submerges, the tracker clicks off.

The purpose of the project is to promote conservation efforts, while raising public awareness about shark populations, many of which are under threat.

Approximately one-third of all shark species are endangered, mainly due to over-fishing.

If you'd like to do more than just watch, you can become an active participant by sending  OCEARCH a donation.



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