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NASA observes solar eruption


NASA's Solar Terrestrial Relations Observatory captured this image of a CME about two hours after it left the sun (courtesy: NASA/STEREO)
NASA's Solar Terrestrial Relations Observatory captured this image of a CME about two hours after it left the sun (courtesy: NASA/STEREO)

Staff writers

November 20, 2012 — The sun erupted on Nov. 20, 2012, at 7:09 a.m. EST, causing a coronal mass ejection (CME).

NASA's Solar Terrestrial Relations Observatory captured a major solar eruption on November 20th.

The phenomenon can send particles into the Earth's atmosphere, causing auroras near the poles one to three days after the eruption.

Unlike a solar flare, a CME is unlikely to cause disruptions to GPS and satellite-based technology.

NASA has observed an increase in solar activity lately.

According to the organization, this latest CME represents one of many recent eruptions, due to the sun's 11-year activity cycle that will peak in 2013.

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