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Ontario's snow via satellite pictures


The areas in light blue show the snow cover in Ontario and New York (Courtesy: University of Wisconsin, Space Science and Engineering Centre)
The areas in light blue show the snow cover in Ontario and New York (Courtesy: University of Wisconsin, Space Science and Engineering Centre)

Staff writers

April 25, 2012 — Check out pictures of the snow cover from Monday's storm in southern Ontario. The difference between no snow and 30 cm? Meteorologist Chris Scott says it was all in the elevation.

20 cm of snow fell in Orangeville, Ontario Monday
20 cm of snow fell in Orangeville, Ontario Monday

Monday's late-season wind, rain and snow storm in Ontario had some people reaching for their winter boots and jackets once again. 

In some parts of the province, it was the biggest helping of snow the region had seen all year. And on Wednesday, with mainly clear skies in sections over the affected areas, that snow was visible on satellite. 

"The snow stuck in a big way in the higher terrain northwest of Toronto and south of Buffalo," says Chris Scott, a meteorologist at The Weather Network. "Looks like the snow level was around 350 m in elevation."

And for many, that elevation meant the difference between no snow and heavy amounts of snow. 

In places like Shelburne, Orangeville and Flesherton, northwest of the city of Toronto, 20 - 30 cm of snow accumulated Monday and Tuesday. While the melting process was already underway by Wednesday, the areas covered in snow were visible on satellite. You can see the affected areas in a 'false-colour' photo, where the snow is shown in light blue. 

Satellite image. (Courtesy: University of Wisconsin, Space Science and Engineering Centre)
Satellite image. (Courtesy: University of Wisconsin, Space Science and Engineering Centre)

That snow on the ground also did something interesting weather-wise for people living in the west-end of the Greater Toronto Area, 

"We were snow-shadowed," says Scott. "With a northwest flow,  there were fewer cumulus clouds over The Weather Network studios than to the east or west. The air is slightly cooler over the snow pack because of the cool ground, inhibiting cumulus development."

Wondering what weather is in store for the rest of the week in Ontario? Be sure to check your local forecast. 

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