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Thursday's 'pink' full moon brings lunar eclipse


Thursday's full moon may not look pink, but if you live in Eastern Hemisphere, you'll notice a partial lunar eclipse.
Thursday's full moon may not look pink, but if you live in Eastern Hemisphere, you'll notice a partial lunar eclipse.

Staff writers

April 25, 2013 — On Thursday night, much of the Eastern Hemisphere will be able to watch a 'pink' full moon as it undergoes a slight lunar eclipse.

Traditionally, the full moon of April is called the "pink" moon, a reference made to the grass pink or wild ground phlox, which is one of the earliest widespread flowers of the spring season.†

Itís also referred to as the Full Sprouting Grass Moon, the Egg Moon, and itís even called the Full Fish Moon by some coastal tribes because spring is when shad fish swim upstream to spawn.

While Thursday's moon won't look much different for anyone in North America, a partial lunar eclipse will be visible in Europe, Asia, Africa and Australia. Astronomers say it may be a challenge to observe, lasting less than 30 minutes for viewers.†

It will not be visible at all in North America, as the eclipse happens between 2 and 6 pm, ET, when the moon is below the horizon.†

When do lunar eclipses happen?

ďAn eclipse of the moon occurs when the sun, earth and moon all come into alignment, and the full moon travels through the Earth's shadow,Ē explains astronomer Andrew Yee.†

A partial lunar eclipse happens when only part of the moon is covered by the Earth's dark shadow.†

Unlike a solar eclipse, a lunar eclipse is perfectly safe to observe with the naked eye and through optical equipment.†

With files from space.com

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