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Tornado Myths Debunked: what to believe?


Lyndsay Morrison, staff writer
October 25, 2012 — It was a summer of extremes in Canada, with heat waves, thunderstorms, floods and tornadoes. There are many untruths about dangerous weather, so we take a look back and set the record straight on Weather Myths - Debunked.


Where's the safest place to go if you see a tornado?
Where's the safest place to go if you see a tornado?

You're driving down a highway, when suddenly you see a tornado approaching. Where do you go? What do you do?

Here at The Weather Network, we received hundreds of emails, calls and tweets  this summer asking what to do - and what not to do - when the weather gets dangerous.  

Turns out, there's a lot of confusion. 

"Over the number of years I've been involved with Environment Canada, we've come across a lot of things people believe to be true based on the internet and other sources," says Geoff Coulsen, a Warning Preparedness Meteorologist. 

This summer, viewers from across the country took to our Facebook and Twitter pages, asking questions like:
  • Is under a highway overpass a safe place to be during active weather?
  • Should you really open all the windows in your house if a tornado warning is issued?
  • Are you safe from tornadoes if you live in a big city?

Are you safe from tornadoes if you live in a big city?
Are you safe from tornadoes if you live in a big city?

In our special feature, "Weather Myths - Debunked," we tackle these questions, and many more, to let you know what's true and what's false. 

"We had a couple of myths really seriously debunked in our big tornado outbreak on August 20 back in 2009," says Coulsen. 

Check out the video to learn how you can keep safe during a tornado.

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