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Another storm for Atlantic Canada


This is becoming an all-too-familiar scene in Atlantic Canada
This is becoming an all-too-familiar scene in Atlantic Canada

Alexandra Pope, staff writer

January 31, 2011 — Atlantic Canadians enjoyed a brief break from near-constant snow this weekend - but that's about to change.

Parts of Atlantic Canada could see up to 40 cm of snow through the middle of the week
Parts of Atlantic Canada could see up to 40 cm of snow through the middle of the week

The storm has been dubbed the “Woodchuck Whopper,” “Wiarton Wallop” and “Marmot Mangler,” and although it hasn't hit yet, meteorologists say this Groundhog Day storm is going to be a doozy.

A system that brought heavy snow to southern Alberta this weekend has merged with a Texas low to form a major winter storm.

The storm will hit southern Ontario first, with up to 30 cm forecast for most major cities on Wednesday.

Then, it will move into the Maritimes, bringing widespread snowfall of up to 30 cm to southern New Brunswick, Prince Edward Island and Nova Scotia.

Southern Nova Scotia could also see freezing rain, depending on the storm's track.

“We're going to get quite the storm,” says Rob Davis, a meteorologist at The Weather Network.

January wasn't kind to Atlantic Canadians, weather-wise.

The region has dealt with near-constant snow, including a nor'easter that brought 28 cm to Moncton Friday - a new record for that date.

Moncton mayor George LeBlanc said the city's public works staff have been working overtime to keep the roads clear of snow, but overall are coping well.

“They get out there, they knuckle down, they clean it up, and they do a great job of it,” he said.

LeBlanc added Moncton is used to getting walloped in the winter.

“We're in a snow belt,” he said. “We're a four-season community here, and my attitude is there's no sense fighting it. You might as well embrace it.”

It's also going to stay cold. The wind will make it feel -20 in St. John's on Tuesday. In Labrador, the wind chill was twice as cold as that on Sunday night. Wind chill values in that range were also seen in northern Ontario on Sunday night.

The Weather Network is tracking this latest storm. Catch your local forecast on TV every 10 minutes on the 10's.

You can also receive weather updates and alerts on your phone.

With files from Lisa Varano.

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