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Avoiding wild animal collisions

Lisa Varano, staff writer

November 14, 2010 — Within seconds, an animal could appear on the road. How do you avoid an accident?

A moose on the side of the road can be difficult to spot
A moose on the side of the road can be difficult to spot

November is a risky time on the roads. Darkness falls early and the roads can be slick. But there is something else to be concerned about, and that is wild animals wandering on the highway.

In the fall, moose are roaming around. These large animals are on the go during mating and migration season, and they may end up in your path -- especially at dusk, in the middle of the night, or in wet weather.

'When it's raining, and the roads are glossy, your eyes don't seem to differentiate on the different shapes... So you should accommodate that and reduce your speed accordingly,' says Constable Gary Cameron of the New Brunswick RCMP.

Area where wild animals are known to cross the road
Area where wild animals are known to cross the road

He says drivers need to make sure they're paying enough attention to the road.

'At night, it's more important that you're really, really cognizant of scanning the highway and using your high beams when you can,' Cameron says.

The Weather Network's Maritime reporter, Shelley Steeves, reports that several people have already died in moose collisions in New Brunswick this fall.

Such a collision could also kill the wild animal, and badly damage a car or even a truck.

Take precautions on the road. Look out for wild animal warning signs. Pull over to the curb or slow to a crawl if you spot an animal on the road ahead. Be aware that even if you only see one animal, it may be travelling in a group.

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