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Earl hits the Maritimes


Click on the above image to watch a slideshow of videos and photos about Earl
Click on the above image to watch a slideshow of videos and photos about Earl

Jill Colton, staff writer

September 4, 2010 — Hurricane Earl made landfall in Nova Scotia on Saturday before becoming a tropical storm.

Earl upooted trees in Halifax. Courtesy Jimmy Connors III.
Earl upooted trees in Halifax. Courtesy Jimmy Connors III.

Earl made landfall as a Category 1 hurricane in Nova Scotia, near the boundary of Shelburne and Queens counties -- about 85 km southwest of Lunenburg -- around 10:30 a.m. ADT, according to the Canadian Hurricane Centre of Environment Canada.

And the storm kept going. Winds gusted at 120 km/h at Halifax International Airport for two straight hours today. The storm has caused travel delays, tree damage, and power outages to hundreds of thousands of customers.

Peak winds of 135 km/h were recorded at Beaver Island in the afternoon. Rainfall totaled 35 to 45 mm in western Nova Scotia and New Brunswick. The West Scotian Slope Buoy saw 13 metre-high waves.

Tropical storm warnings were in in effect into the overnight hours for western Newfoundland.

Fallen tree narrowly misses houses in Amherst, Nova Scotia. Courtesy Ken MacKenzie.
Fallen tree narrowly misses houses in Amherst, Nova Scotia. Courtesy Ken MacKenzie.

In Nova Scotia, Highway 102 was closed from Lacewood Drive to the Highway 10 turn off and the Halifax Shopping Centre was closed due to power outages. At Halifax airport, carriers Porter and West Jet grounded flights in and out of Halifax because of safety concerns.

According to Shelley Steeves, The Weather Network's Maritime reporter, heavy rain pooled on roads and posed a hydroplaning threat. In Yarmouth, leaves on the roads caused slippery conditions.

The municipal EMO emergency operations centre in Halifax opened early this morning with representatives of various municipal departments, utilities, and emergency response teams (police, fire, ambulance, and 911), and other agencies such as the Canadian Red Cross. The EMO asks residents not to call 911 for non-emergency situations, including inquiries into road closures, power outages, non-emergency tree falls, or other general information.

In the interest of public safety, the RCMP was keeping people out of provincial park beaches, and the main road into Peggy’s Cove was closed to all but local traffic.

Earl swooped down on New England waters on Friday night after it sideswiped North Carolina's Outer Banks. It then brushed against the Northeast but that was far less intense than originally feared. Sheets of rain poured down on Cape Cod.

For more on Tropical Storm Earl, click our Tropical Storm Centre. You can also tune into The Weather Network on TV for our extensive coverage of Earl.

With files from Lisa Varano and The Associated Press

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