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Fall Outlook 2011


2011 Fall Temperature Outlook
2011 Fall Temperature Outlook

The Weather Network meteorologists release their outlook for Fall 2011. Find out what you can expect in your area for the season.

2011 Fall Precipitation Outlook
2011 Fall Precipitation Outlook

A closer look at fall

Anomalies associated with La Niña still weakly remain across North America making the seasonal forecast challenging. Much like the 2011 Summer Outlook, changeable weather is expected in central and eastern Canada with alternating spells of warm and cool weather, while other areas will experience milder temperature swings. An active storm track from the northern U.S. Plains through the upper Great Lakes and another one for Atlantic Canada is associated with the changeable weather and will yield above average precipitation in these parts. See below for provincial and regional breakdowns for September 1 through November 30.

British Columbia
Temperatures for the fall period are expected to be near normal with the exception of the central and north coasts where temperatures are expected to be below normal. The central and south interior regions will also experience lower than normal precipitation while the rest of the province can expect near normal precipitation.

Alberta and Saskatchewan
Both provinces can expect a very typical fall season with near normal temperatures and precipitation.

Manitoba
Manitoba will see near normal temperatures and precipitation this fall, except for the southeast tip of the province where above normal precipitation is expected.

Ontario
Regions along the Lake Superior shore can expect higher than normal temperatures and precipitation this autumn. The rest of the province will see near normal temperatures and precipitation.

Quebec
Northern Quebec will experience warmer than normal temperatures and near normal precipitation. The rest of the province can expect near normal fall conditions.

The Maritimes and Newfoundland
Temperatures across the Maritimes and Newfoundland will be near normal this fall. Above normal temperatures are expected for northwest Labrador. Labrador and the Northern Peninsula in Newfoundland will experience near normal precipitation. The rest of Newfoundland and all of the Maritime provinces will have above normal precipitation.

The North
Yukon, Northwest Territories and Nunavut can expect a very typical fall season with near normal temperatures and precipitation.

Regional Breakdown

CityTemperature ForecastPrecipitation ForecastAverage temperaturesAverage Precipitation
VancouverNear normalNear normalHigh 14
Low 7
Mean 10
347 mm
VictoriaNear normalNear normalHigh 14
Low 6
Mean 10
253 mm
CalgaryNear normalNear normalHigh 11
Low -2
Mean 4
72 mm
EdmontonNear normalNear normalHigh 9
Low -3
Mean 3
85 mm
ReginaNear normalNear normalHigh 10
Low -3
Mean 4
67 mm
SaskatoonNear normalNear normalHigh 9
Low -3
Mean 3
61 mm
WinnipegNear normalNear normalHigh 10
Low -1
Mean 4
113 mm
Thunder BayAbove normalAbove normalHigh 10
Low -1
Mean 4
206 mm
SudburyNear normalNear normalHigh 10
Low 1
Mean 6
260 mm
OttawaNear normalNear normalHigh 12
Low 3
Mean 8
245 mm
TorontoNear normalNear normalHigh 14
Low 4
Mean 9
211 mm
WindsorNear normalNear normalHigh 16
Low 7
Mean 11
236 mm
MontrealNear normalNear normalHigh 13
Low 4
Mean 8
263 mm
FrederictonNear normalAbove normalHigh 13
Low 2
Mean 7
295 mm
MonctonNear normalAbove normalHigh 13
Low 2
Mean 7
301 mm
CharlottetownNear normalAbove normalHigh 12
Low 4
Mean 8
315 mm
HalifaxNear normalAbove normalHigh 13
Low 4
Mean 9
378 mm
St. John’sNear normalAbove normalHigh 11
Low 3
Mean 7
437 mm
IqaluitNear normalNear normalHigh -2
Low -8
Mean -5
121 mm
YellowknifeNear normalNear normalHigh 1
Low -6
Mean -3
91 mm
WhitehorseNear normalNear normalHigh 4
Low -5
Mean 1
77 mm

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