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Making the perfect Christmas wreath


Shelley Steeves, reporting
November 16, 2011 — Shelley Steeves visited the Yuletide Tree Lot in Upper Cloverdale, New Brunswick, and finds out what it takes to make a Christmas wreath.


It takes a few good frosts before a wreath can look its best
It takes a few good frosts before a wreath can look its best

It takes a lot of work to make a perfect Christmas wreath.

And if anyone knows how to do it, it's Nancy Secord from the Yuletide Tree Lot in Upper Cloverdale, New Brunswick.

The first step in making a wreath is choosing the bough. Secord recommends balsam fir boughs. “They last longer, they have a flatter needle that you can do a wreath much nicer,“ she says.

But, don't rush out and try to make your own wreath just yet. “You need a few good frosts before the needles and branches will harden off,“ Secord says. “Because when you go out to go tipping you need to be able to snap the ends off.“

It's been relatively mild so far across the East Coast, but Secord says there was just enough cool weather to make things work. “I kept checking the weather and finally we had enough frost that we could start tipping,“ she says.

Unlike a Christmas tree, wreaths can't be watered. So it's recommended to keep them outside. “Most people will put them outside. I know one lady who will take and I know one lady who will take them inside but she mists it fresh,“ Secord says.

“But they will stay fresh long after Christmas. So they are a nice decoration to have.“

If you want to try making your own wreath at home, just be sure to wait until there's been a few frosts so the boughs will harden.

Or, if you're not the craftiest person, you can always buy one from someone who does it best.

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