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Storm targets Newfoundland


Blowing snow in Newfoundland
Blowing snow in Newfoundland

Lacy Atalick, staff writer

December 27, 2010 — A storm that battered the U.S. eastern seaboard has climbed its way up the Atlantic coast, trudging through New Brunswick and Nova Scotia, and currently making its way into Newfoundland.

Fifteen to 30 centimetres of snow could fall in parts of the Maritimes over the next two days.
Fifteen to 30 centimetres of snow could fall in parts of the Maritimes over the next two days.

Nova Scotia Power spokesperson Stacey Pineau says just over 30,000 customers are without power, mostly in the western part of the province and moving eastward.

“The power outages are caused by heavy, wet snow that is bringing trees and tree limbs down onto power lines. We have 100 crews who are working to restore power as quickly and as safely as they can. Because of some of the road conditions they are facing with this storm, it might take some of them a little bit longer to get from place to place and it might also be difficult to access some damaged equipment,” Pineau said.

At this point, she said she expects power will be restored by early Monday evening.

Rain expected to fall in Newfoundland.
Rain expected to fall in Newfoundland.

The power outages caused by the storm were most prevalent in the Moncton and Sussex regions, with approximately 11,500 customers without power, according to New Brunswick Power spokesperson Meghan Gerrish.

The snowfall that has been pummeling Nova Scotia is expected to turn into rain, as it spreads up to Newfoundland and Labrador. These conditions are expected through Tuesday. The Weather Network meteorologist Dayna Vettese said Tuesday should see light snowfall, with the precipitation lightning up by Wednesday. There are currently multiple weather warnings in effect throughout Atlantic Canada.

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